Now, with this HRL’s new nanofunctionalization technique that’s easily scalable, it’s possible to 3D print these high-strength alloys in all shapes and sizes. This allows faster, cheaper, and more detailed manufacturing using high-strength materials. Furthermore, because melting and solidification in 3D printing is akin to welding, their technique makes it possible to weld previously unweldable alloys. To determine which particles had the properties they needed, the HRL team asked help from Citrine Informatics. “The point of using informatics software was to do a selective approach to the nucleation theory we knew to find the materials with the exact properties we needed,” HRL’s Brennan Yahata explained. “Once we told them what to look for, their big data analysis narrowed the field of available materials from hundreds of thousands to a select few. We went from a haystack to a handful of possible needles.”

This entry was posted in Tecnology_&_Science and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.